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 Japan - Ground/Air/Maritime Self Defense Forces, Military/Political Discussions
Callsign 24 Seira
Posted: Jul 13 2008, 06:33 PM


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Japan’s About-Face is a remarkable window into the shifting role of the military in post-war Japanese society. WIDE ANGLE has acquired unprecedented access to the National Defense Academy, Japan’s “West Point.” We follow Defense Academy cadets preparing for a future that may involve overseas deployment, and meet with a group of peace activists — some of them atom bomb survivors — on a grueling two month, 750-mile protest march from Hiroshima to Tokyo.

Click here to view the video :
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/wideangle/episodes...l-episode/1641/



Related links :
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan_Self-Defense_Forces

Many videos on Youtube...these are some of it.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IUtyYojGgM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPx69_cTNlk&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GOZ66ToY16o&feature=related

This post has been edited by Callsign 24 Seira on Jul 13 2008, 07:21 PM


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“You've never lived until you've almost died. For those who have fought for it, life has a flavor the protected shall never know.”

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Sayaret
Posted: Jul 13 2008, 08:32 PM


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Its time the Japanese Armed Forces become more "vocal" - it needs to because of the current political situations - the expanding and increased Chinese military expenditure, its non-transparency of strategies / policies etc plus the outright intrusion into Japanese territorial waters, the North Korean situation (though disarment in progress, but uncertainty continues)....the Chinese ambitions for domination of South China Seas and the Asian region....

The Japanese should not let past ghosts hinder itself from effectively protecting themselves.....afterall they are very much more technologically more advanced than the Chinese...plus they have the financial clout to do so....


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MilFan
Posted: Jul 13 2008, 11:34 PM


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Perhaps the Ghost in question is not its imperialistic past, but the fact that Japan has not paid war reparations nor admit to the atrocities committed. Look at the germans, the nation faced its guilt and today, they can walk tall and have no need to whitewash their past.

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LazerLordz
Posted: Jul 14 2008, 02:36 AM


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QUOTE (MilFan @ Jul 13 2008, 11:34 PM)
Perhaps the Ghost in question is not its imperialistic past, but the fact that Japan has not paid war reparations nor admit to the atrocities committed. Look at the germans, the nation faced its guilt and today, they can walk tall and have no need to whitewash their past.

They did admit, officially too on many occasions. But they were quite low-key, and in this media driven world, it's almost as good as not having said it, in the eyes of the victims.




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Sayaret
Posted: Jul 14 2008, 10:18 AM


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Agree with Ladzer....just calculate how much monetary gains the Chinese got from them interms of "soft" loans, monetary aid programmes, donations, direct contributions etc....which the Chinese took for granted as its "god-given" rights that the Japanese should give and give....most of the funds were for "supposed" projects to help the country economically or facilitate infrastructures....but where the funds eventually end up is anyone's guess....but enough of speculations....the Japanese have woken up and I remembered an article which said that the Japanese govt was halting all such aid programmes to China becos' of the country's economic prowess now and also that it has enough monetary buffers to help itself....which of course infuriated the Chinese... ouch... laugh.gif laugh.gif

The Japanese have or used to have an almost undisputed lead in the naval arena in Asia, but that is threatened or eroded by possible Indian or Chinese naval build-ups..... though they still possess a very formidable and advanced navy, they would need to increase its technological edge and perhaps the numerical factor too if they wish to be able to handle the Chinese situation.... they basically face the same issues as the US Navy (Pacific)....lack of numbers, except for them it could be alittle bit better as they only have to look after one ocean...


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YourFather
Posted: Jul 14 2008, 10:27 AM


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QUOTE
They did admit, officially too on many occasions. But they were quite low-key, and in this media driven world, it's almost as good as not having said it, in the eyes of the victims.


Not only admit, but also paid compensation through ODA. This issue of reparations and apologies is nothing more than something used to milk Japan's imperial past. The way I see it, Japan can more fully atone for its past deeds by being a constructive and active participant in international affairs instead of using it's pacifist constitution as a shield to shirk from its responsibilities.


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FIVE-TWO
Posted: Jul 14 2008, 11:02 AM


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its not how much money they compensate or how many time they repeat the "apology". until their education and societal mentality recognises the historical facts, this "ghost" will never go away.
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LazerLordz
Posted: Jul 14 2008, 11:16 AM


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QUOTE (FIVE-TWO @ Jul 14 2008, 11:02 AM)
its not how much money they compensate or how many time they repeat the "apology". until their education and societal mentality recognises the historical facts, this "ghost" will never go away.

Well, you can certainly blame that on the way that the LDP has managed to stay in power, because the left has been more vocal against whitewashing or simple ignorance of the importance of educating the youth about the misdeeds of the past.


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FIVE-TWO
Posted: Jul 14 2008, 11:31 AM


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I am not really interested in apportioning blame, merely observing facts, events and their consequences. as a society they have to live with it.
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Sayaret
Posted: Jul 14 2008, 12:27 PM


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As a society many of their people knew what happened despite their educational system not having the full details or whitewash....but in this age of internet infor, what's to white wash??? Unlike the Chinese, they do not control the internet content.... So your point of society living with it means what?? That the whole population have to prostrate towards China every day?? What the political parties decide is political, you need to understand what the general population feels about it and whether they are also in denial too.... which I strongly don't think so because I have many Japanese friends who say that the past is the reason why they are strongly against use of force unless really really necessary and for self defence... they acknowledge the wrongs of their earlier generations....they don't offer any excuse except that they feel it was part of war that the unfortunate events occurred becos' they (their forefathers etc) were lead by wrong leaders and even then it was a different world then.... the concept of overlordship was still very much alive....

For the Japanese to atone for their wrongs, as YF said, they need to effectively and actively contribute to promote peace and stability in the region and the world and takes its place as a powerhouse in its own right....and not avoid...

Afterall they are a proud race and they too as humans have their own pride...therefore how long and how many times can you go on harping on their wrongs.....moreso they are used as targets for certain obvious reasons which are used by existing govt to divert anger towards foreigners....to foster national unity...



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FIVE-TWO
Posted: Jul 14 2008, 02:44 PM


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you seem to have forgotten that we were victims too. ask your grandparents what happened to them during the war. my own father nearly got "invited" up their lorries.

don't think I am saying this for or against china or for or against japs. I hold my position as a people who had directly suffered. if you have forgotten or never even knew, high time to find out.
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LazerLordz
Posted: Jul 14 2008, 10:42 PM


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QUOTE (FIVE-TWO @ Jul 14 2008, 02:44 PM)
you seem to have forgotten that we were victims too. ask your grandparents what happened to them during the war. my own father nearly got "invited" up their lorries.

don't think I am saying this for or against china or for or against japs. I hold my position as a people who had directly suffered. if you have forgotten or never even knew, high time to find out.

Well, my late grandfather was nearly executed by the IJA and yet he said once, "I'll forgive, but I'll never forget what happened".

We know our history, we have not forgotten, but we're not about to harp on old issues time and time again just for the sake of nothing more than mere drumming up of emotions that does not benefit both sides in the long run.

And may I also say that our politicians should not even try to comment or interfere in Chinese-Japanese relations in the context of WW2


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Sayaret
Posted: Jul 15 2008, 12:09 AM


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I did not say forget.... I am merely saying that it cannot be harped on and again... whether for political gains or whatever.... but it should not be brought up time and again.... the study of history (the past) is for us to learn and understand the past.... to learn from it and to build on what is good to make it better, and for what is bad, it would be for it never to do again or let is happen again....

History is for understanding and knowledge.... not for the benefit of manipulation... I lost my grandfather in the war too....

If such acts are barbaric, then perhaps the Chinese themselves should destroy the artifi-facts belonging to Chin Sze Huang Di (first Emperor)... he was very bit cruel is he not?? Then why glorify him?? Becos he is Chinese?? No because there is much to learn from his cruelty.... it was necessary for him to be so to unite China....


Anyway, the topic is on Japanese military role being shifted.....


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FIVE-TWO
Posted: Jul 15 2008, 12:35 AM


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I just want to remind people that the Chinese are not the only victims of the Japanese. So everytime their wartime deeds come up it always gyrates towards Chinese and Japanese, and it starts to take on a for/against China thing.

Let me also say, those who don't realise what they have done, will do it again. OK I give you back your saboon box.
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chino
Posted: Jul 15 2008, 02:01 AM


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QUOTE (Sayaret @ Jul 15 2008, 12:09 AM)
Anyway, the topic is on Japanese military role being shifted.....

Bingo! Donkey Boy!

So why not go stuff your face instead of turning every thread into an anti-China thread?
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Sayaret
Posted: Jul 15 2008, 12:01 PM


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Hi 5-2,

Hope you don't misunderstand my point that its purely people from China who suffered under Japanese occupation or that I have forgotten about the cruelty suffered.... I pointed out this group becos' they are the largest "protesters" and also the group that have benefitted most from these "protests".... I can relate to those who have lost loved ones in the war, my grandmother became a widow at a very very young age and my own mother and uncles suffered terribly during those years so I don't condone the Japanese military actions....but neither do I support the continued hatred or supposed hatred in order to gain leverages of sorts....

Hope it clarifies my statements, my fellow MN.. tongue.gif thanks.


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LazerLordz
Posted: Jul 15 2008, 02:49 PM


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QUOTE (chino @ Jul 15 2008, 02:01 AM)
QUOTE (Sayaret @ Jul 15 2008, 12:09 AM)
Anyway, the topic is on Japanese military role being shifted.....

Bingo! Donkey Boy!

So why not go stuff your face instead of turning every thread into an anti-China thread?

This thread is not anti-China, but it is impossible to fully remove the Chinese equation from any discussion involving realignment of Japanese military forces, because the context has been regrettably laid for the past decades or so....


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Sayaret
Posted: Jul 15 2008, 03:48 PM


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Thanks for clarification Lazerlordz....its true becos Japanese military - rearmament or realignment etc definitely has alot to do with PRC policy and its military strategies and build-up. And of course the Chinese military White Paper too....
The Japanese are wary of the Chinese for obvious reasons, the giant dwarfs it many ties over in terms of size and population and also its almost unstoppable military build-up (in the guise of replacement or upgrading etc)....plus its support of North Korea antics (launching of missile over Japanese teritories etc)
I think the only way forward is perhaps a genuine dialogue or meeting (continous) between the 2 nations over issues which are centred on them (like the territorial issues etc) - but both parties must be compromising and not confrontational or stubborn.... The Chinese can be non-transparent over its military stuff but in terms of negotiations and talks it must show its sincerity or at least look sincere to give its neighbours some peace of mind and prevent them from 2nd guessing....


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chino
Posted: Jul 18 2008, 02:54 AM


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QUOTE (LazerLordz @ Jul 15 2008, 02:49 PM)
QUOTE (chino @ Jul 15 2008, 02:01 AM)
QUOTE (Sayaret @ Jul 15 2008, 12:09 AM)
Anyway, the topic is on Japanese military role being shifted.....

Bingo! Donkey Boy!

So why not go stuff your face instead of turning every thread into an anti-China thread?

This thread is not anti-China, but it is impossible to fully remove the Chinese equation from any discussion involving realignment of Japanese military forces, because the context has been regrettably laid for the past decades or so....

Having a strong military offered us in Singapore many advantages that are way beyond military or security in value.

With a strong military, we achieved a global status as a nation or people that just being rich will not get us.

Our military is also instrumental in our nation building and in forging us as one people with pride.

Japan is no different. It doesn't want to just be a rich country, but a weak nation - or to continue to have a weak voice in global affairs. To gain real international respect, there is no other way.

But most importantly, Japan needs a strong military to regain its identity as a strong and proud people. It is now nothing but an American lackey, to put it crudely.

Regarding security, Russia poses the biggest headache for Japan. Russia occupies a huge chunk of land that is formerly Japan (or so they claim) and every year, Japan asks for it back. And every year, Russia tell them to forget it. So if Japan successfully rearms, no price for guessing what will be their first order of business.

OTOH, China does not occupy any Jap territory.

As a military threat, China can't even retake nearby ROC by force.

Heck, PRC don't even try to retake little Matsu or Quemoy - which are spitting distance from PRC but faraway from ROC. biggrin.gif
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Callsign 24 Seira
Posted: Jul 24 2008, 12:10 AM


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Quiet changes in Japan's defense
By MASAHIRO MATSUMURA
Tuesday, July 22, 2008

OSAKA — Japan appears to be drifting aimlessly under a divided government, and its external policy seems equally disoriented under a Fukuda administration that has been up to its neck and largely unsuccessful in blazing new trails for the country. Surprisingly, though, bureaucratic autopilot does not pervade Japanese politics.

Since the late 1990s, Japan has kept in step with increasingly sophisticated U.S. military advances centered on networked, information-dominant strategies, often referred to as the Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA). The greater investments that Japan has had to make to keep in step with U.S. RMA advances have transformed the traditional nature of the bilateral power relationship that represents the U.S.-Japan alliance.

To keep an element of proportion on U.S. RMA advances, Tokyo has aimed at achieving a gradual and limited transformation, with the initial focus on creating advanced RMA enclaves consisting of Aegis vessels, AWACS aircraft and some C4ISR (command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) sensors, installations and facilities.

This core will serve as the base upon which Japan develops its military in the future. With the U.S. military bogged down in Iraq, the Japanese policy of spending restraint has turned out to be propitious. The Iraq quagmire has consumed considerable defense expenditures that would otherwise have been spent to accelerate the U.S. RMA drive.

With limited C4ISR assets, Japan can take only sub-optimal advantage of the network-centric RMA. Japan will be able to exert full military efficacy only when the Self-Defense Forces enjoy guaranteed access to necessary information and data from global U.S. C4ISR networks. Hence, before making capital-intensive acquisitions, Tokyo must raise its accessibility to the U.S. C4ISR networks, or negotiate for Washington to release C4ISR information and data to Japan.

RMA demands comprehensive protection of classified military information across C4ISR networks on the grounds that network-centricity inherent in system integration makes it almost impossible to meaningfully isolate a particular subsystem from the whole and still protect each piece of classified information in an isolated manner. In August 2007, Japan and the United States concluded a General Security of Military Information Agreement (GSOMIA) setting the basic bilateral framework for the comprehensive protection of classified information.

In pursuit of the RMA transformation, the U.S-Japan GSOMIA will contribute not only to deepening the bilateral alliance but also to elevating Japan's position within the hierarchy of the U.S. military hegemonic system. Such potential will be fully developed only when Tokyo institutes its own legal-administrative regime for the protection of classified military information, in a manner that facilitates a significantly higher level of authorization to release information.

During the Cold War, Japan was totally detached from the core circle of the U.S. military hegemonic system: the U.S.-led COMINT (Communication Intelligence) alliance of Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, whose close relationships were made possible by GSOMIAs and other related legal instruments.

As Japan's RMA policy may appear low-profile and sluggish, marked by the gradual and limited acquisition of major platforms, one may overlook that the policy has laid out the necessary institutional infrastructure for a RMA transformation, a demonstration of Japan's commitment to significantly enhancing military coordination, cooperation and collaboration with the U.S. The U.S.-Japan GSOMIA is a crucial element of this. Through such institutional deepening, Japan's RMA policy has strengthened the bilateral alliance relationship.

Given the regional security environment, Japan's approach to RMA offers an important model for other Asian allies to redefine their relationship with the U.S. and to re-identify their positions in the U.S. military hegemonic system. These resource-constrained Asian countries can learn from Japan's alliance policy, and from the Japanese RMA model that involves phased policy priority and sequential policy execution. Countries may opt to strengthen the alliance relationship with the U.S. through active RMA transformation, with initial priority placed on institutional transformation, and the gradual but limited acquisition of network-centric platforms and infrastructure.

Conversely, they may choose to weaken or even break the alliance relationship by rejecting RMA or adopting a sub-optimal or superficial RMA transformation. Alternatively, they may choose to procrastinate leaving their alliances adrift.

The U.S.-led RMA has great potential to alter the U.S. military hegemonic system centered on Northeast Asia. The RMA now presses its regional allies to re-define their alliance relationship with the U.S. Most important, Japan is already firmly anchored to the system through its own unique RMA policy, progressively preparing for full RMA transformation.

With the U.S.-Japan alliance so reinforced, South Korea and Taiwan would do well to emulate the Japanese RMA model, thereby serving as important pillars of the U.S. system in the region.

Masahiro Matsumura is professor of international politics of the Faculty of Law and Political Science at St. Andrew's University (Momoyama Gakuin Daigaku) in Osaka.

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/eo20080722a4.html


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