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 Philippines Miltary modernization Programs, Status of the Capability Upgrade Program
xtemujin
  Posted: Dec 30 2011, 05:12 PM


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The Philippines’ Navy Challenge
By Koh Swee Lean Collin
Tuesday, December 27, 2011

This month, the Philippine Navy deployed its latest warship, the BRP Gregorio del Pilar. The vessel is a 46-year-old former U.S. Coast Guard cutter and, amidst the fanfare since Manila first acquired the vessel, the Benigno Aquino administration has also announced its intention to bolster the country’s maritime security capabilities.

The move seems aimed squarely at responding to ongoing tensions in the South China Sea, where increased Chinese assertiveness in disputed waters has prompted the Philippine government to vow to modernize its armed forces, particularly its navy. These tensions have spiked this year as Chinese vessels have harassed other ships in the region, including in March the Philippine government oil exploration vessel MV Venture off Reed Bank in the Spratlys.

The Reed Bank incident was closely followed by alleged Chinese aerial intrusions over Philippine-held territory in the Spratlys in May and June; during one such incident, a Chinese military plane was claimed to have buzzed and intimidated a Philippine fishing vessel operating in the area.

While military activities have since subsided, intrusions by Chinese fishermen have continued. In October, a Chinese fishing vessel was confronted by a Philippine Navy warship in waters off the Philippine-held Recto Bank in the Spratlys, upon which the Chinese vessel hastily released more than thirty dinghies it was then towing. This sparked a flurry of diplomatic activity in which Beijing curtly demanded Manila return the impounded dinghies.

With such activities in mind,Aquino has underscored his administration’s determination to bolster the capabilities of the armed forces to deal with external security threats. In public, of course, the Aquino administration has shied from openly fingering China as the primary motivation for its planned modernization. But under a 40 billion peso, five-year plan, the Philippine Navy is expected to see its share of the spending pie increase significantly.

Top of the wish list has been the acquisition of patrol cutters from Washington. Following the acquisition of the BRP Gregorio de Pilar, Manila is tipped to receive a second similar ship, and possibly a third, by early next year. There have also been plans for the Navy is to take delivery of a single locally-built landing craft and three multi-purpose fast attack craft (gun-armed). In addition, the three existing Jacinto class patrol vessels bought from the British in the 1990s have recently been sent for upgrades.

Still, despite its aspirations and its five-year plan, the Philippine Navy is high on ambitions, but likely low on the funding necessary to fully satisfy its wish list. At present, the Navy acquisitions are mainly funded by proceeds from the Malampaya offshore gas field operation, although if there’s a steady revenue stream from this and other planned offshore oil and gas sites the acquisitions may yet be realized.

The problem for the Aquino administration, though, is that it’s not just about the money. Of course, the Aquino government has taken a much more proactive stance in response to the perceived increase in Chinese activities in the South China Sea. In September, for example, Aquino issued Executive Order Number 57, an official policy that emphasizes maritime security. However, this approach isn’t fully endorsed by the armed forces, nor by some vocal lawmakers who continue to tout internal security as the most pertinent issue the military faces.

The lack of policy consensus within the Philippine government is a problem that has long plagued the country’s military modernization plans, which for decades have seemed to favor internal security advocates. Recent unrest in the restive southern Philippines may give this camp even more ammunition.

To compound matters, many within the defense and diplomatic establishments have opposed the beefing up of the Navy to safeguard the country’s South China Sea maritime interests, pointing out repeatedly that the Mutual Defense Treaty with Washington ensures the external security of the Philippines. As a result, there has been relatively little effort to revive interest in substantially overhauling the Navy’s capacity to address Philippine concerns in the region.

Indeed, the Army still enjoys the lion’s share of defense appropriations, reflecting the continued focus on internal security. The acquisition of the Gregorio del Pilar does little to change this, and although the vessel’s freshly-applied gray paint may disguise its age, this ageing warship can’t hide the fact that parts of the Philippine Navy are doing little more than rusting.

One of the problemsManila’s maritime security planning has faced is that it has tended to be reactive. Until the Mischief Reef incident in 1995, the Philippine government had adopted a rather ambivalent attitude towards maritime security, with the Navy accorded the lowest priority for funding.

But when the Chinese presence was discovered on Mischief Reef, the Ramos administration was galvanized to modernize the Navy, including the acquisition of better-equipped warships to provide a more credible deterrent against further Chinese transgressions in the Spratlys. Yet even then, the modernization plan was only implemented partially.

Modest armament plans, such as the acquisition of a quartet of missile-armed attack craft from Spain, came to nothing, as did last-ditch alternatives such as acquiring surplus Tarantul class missile craft from Russia. As a result, after much hype about the Philippine Navy finally seeing an end to decades of neglect, little came of Ramos’ plans. In contrast, the Philippine Coastguard has entered the fray in competing for scarce resources and has actually met with some success, thanks in part to funding from the Australian government.

As a result of the continued lack of neglect, the Philippine Navy has found itself virtually helpless in response to Chinese incursions. In June 1999, the BRP Sierra Madre ran aground in the Spratlys, and was then harassed by a pair of armed Chinese ships before a recovery operation was undertaken.

As some within the Philippine military have pointed out, while it takes years to build up a credible defense capacity, a crisis in the South China Sea could literally happen overnight. Yet without the requisite military capacity in place, there’s virtually nothing that the Philippines could do short of provoking war. Whether the Aquino administration has the stomach to tackle the challenge of bolstering the country’s maritime security remains to be seen.

Koh Swee Lean Collin is an associate research fellow at the Institute of Defence and Strategic Studies, a constituent of the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies in the Nanyang Technological University.

http://the-diplomat.com/flashpoints-blog/2...navy-challenge/

This post has been edited by xtemujin on Dec 30 2011, 05:16 PM


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Individual skill is another important factor, argues Professor Bernard Loo, a defence analyst at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies. “A half-past-six weapon in the hands of a skilled operator is better than a top-notch weapon in the hands of a half-trained monkey,” he says.
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adroth
Posted: Dec 31 2011, 04:30 AM


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PF-15 @ Malampaya oil field

user posted image

user posted image
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Joe Black
Posted: Feb 22 2012, 12:04 AM


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They would still need to be upgraded to be effective. Otherwise, they are as good as being an OPV.

I would think that each of the Hamilton should have at least some self-protection capability with a CIWS, quad Harpoons and some SAMs (eg. SeaRAM or ESSM).
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homing
Posted: Feb 23 2012, 07:00 PM


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Wonder if the PZL W-3A Sokol of the Philippine Air Force can be up armed to become nearer to what is to the W-3WA (Polish armed version)?


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WE LIVE IN INTERESTING TIMES WHERE DANGER IS ALWAYS AROUND THE CORNER !!!
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evo
Posted: Mar 8 2012, 02:06 PM


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This article claims that drone strikes have commenced in the Philippines.

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2...4732969894.html

Not sure if this can be verified...


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xtemujin
  Posted: Apr 11 2012, 10:50 AM


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Philippine warship in standoff with China vessels
11 April 2012

By JIM GOMEZ, Associated Press

MANILA, Philippines (AP) — The Philippines' largest warship was engaged in a tense standoff with Chinese surveillance vessels Wednesday at a disputed South China Sea shoal, after the ship attempted to arrest Chinese fishermen but was blocked by the surveillance craft.

Philippine Foreign Secretary Albert Del Rosario has summoned Chinese Ambassador Ma Keqing in an attempt to resolve the impasse diplomatically. Del Rosario's office said in a statement that the Scarborough Shoal "is an integral part of Philippine territory" and Filipino authorities would assert sovereignty over the offshore area.

The Chinese Embassy has accused the Philippine warship of harassing the fishermen.

China and the Philippines both claim ownership of the shoal — which lies off the northwestern Philippine province of Zambales — as well as other areas in the South China Sea.

The Spratly Islands south of the shoal are claimed by China, the Philippines, Vietnam, Brunei, Malaysia and Taiwan. The chain of barren islands, reefs and coral outcrops are believed to be in rich in oil and gas and the overlapping claims have long been feared as Asia's next flashpoint for armed conflict.

The current standoff began Sunday when a Philippine navy surveillance plane sighted eight Chinese fishing vessels anchored in a lagoon at Scarborough, the Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs said. That prompted the military to deploy its largest warship, the BRP Gregorio del Pilar, which was recently acquired from the United States.

On Tuesday, Filipino sailors from the warship boarded the Chinese vessels for an inspection, discovering large amounts of illegally collected coral, giant clams and live sharks inside the first boat, the department said in a statement.

Two Chinese maritime surveillance ships, identified as Zhonggou Haijian 75 and Zhonggou Haijian 84, later approached and positioned themselves between the Philippine warship and the Chinese fishing vessels "thus preventing the arrests of the erring Chinese fishermen," the statement said.

Philippine Foreign Affairs spokesman Raul Hernandez said Wednesday that the situation at the shoal "has not changed as of this morning. There's a standoff."

The Chinese Embassy said 12 fishing boats had taken shelter from a storm in a lagoon.

"Two Chinese marine surveillance ships are in this area fulfilling the duties of safeguarding Chinese maritime rights and interests," it said in a statement.

It said the shoal "is an integral part of the Chinese territory and the waters around it the traditional fishing area for Chinese fishermen."

The Philippine navy was sending additional vessels toward the shoal, which lies about 200 kilometers (124 miles) from the nearest Philippine coast, a Philippine navy official told The Associated Press. He spoke on condition of anonymity because of a lack of authority to discuss the situation with the media.

Del Rosario protested to Ma, the Chinese ambassador in Manila, late Tuesday and told her that the navy would enforce Philippine laws, according to his office.

Last year, the Philippines accused Chinese vessels of intruding into other parts of what it considers Philippine territory in the South China Sea. China has regularly dismissed the protests, saying Beijing has indisputable sovereignty over those areas on historical grounds.

The United States has insisted it takes no sides in the territorial dispute but says it should be solved peacefully. China has balked at what it considered a U.S. interference in the region.

The disputes over the Spratlys have settled into an uneasy standoff since the last major clash involving China and Vietnam killed more than 70 Vietnamese sailors in 1988.

Faced with China's formidable military, the Philippines and Vietnam have forged closer ties. Aside from military accords, the two countries have agreed to set up a hotline between their coast guards and maritime police to monitor maritime incidents, such as piracy and incursions into their territorial waters.

The Philippine navy announced Tuesday that Philippine and Vietnamese would play football and basketball matches in the islands they occupy in the Spratlys as a novel way to build trust in the contested region.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/articl...44ebb96d5d96322

This post has been edited by xtemujin on Apr 11 2012, 05:42 PM


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Individual skill is another important factor, argues Professor Bernard Loo, a defence analyst at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies. “A half-past-six weapon in the hands of a skilled operator is better than a top-notch weapon in the hands of a half-trained monkey,” he says.
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xtemujin
  Posted: Apr 12 2012, 08:37 PM


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Philippines says warship removed from China standoff
Posted: 12 April 2012 1539 hrs

MANILA: The Philippines said Thursday it had pulled its biggest warship out of a standoff with Chinese vessels, but the impasse was not resolved with China sending a third ship to the disputed waters.

Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert del Rosario would not why say the Philippines had pulled out the navy ship, which had been stationed near a tiny set of islands in the South China Sea since Sunday in an effort to arrest Chinese fishermen caught fishing there.

"That is an operational undertaking I can't discuss with you," he said.


The pullout means the Philippines is left with a coast guard search and rescue boat as its only presence in the disputed waters.

Meanwhile, Del Rosario said a third Chinese maritime vessel had arrived to back up the two Chinese surveillance ships that had been there since Tuesday.

The Chinese vessels had been blocking the Philippine plan to arrest the fishermen.

"There are three ships there now. Three white ships. The third ship arrived today, this morning, I understand. It's a Bureau of Fisheries Chinese civilian ship," he said.

Asked whether the Philippine government was alarmed at the extra Chinese presence, he said: "Well, we are watching developments and, at the same time, we are pursuing the diplomatic track in terms of coming to a resolution on the issue."

He said the Chinese ambassador to Manila, Ma Keqing, had not informed him that China was sending an additional ship, despite negotiating with her to try and resolve the issue.

- AFP/wm


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Individual skill is another important factor, argues Professor Bernard Loo, a defence analyst at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies. “A half-past-six weapon in the hands of a skilled operator is better than a top-notch weapon in the hands of a half-trained monkey,” he says.
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who
Posted: Apr 13 2012, 12:26 AM


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Read on JDW that Japan is looking into donating ships to Phillipines , any1 any idea which?
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weasel1962
Posted: Apr 13 2012, 09:10 AM


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QUOTE (who @ Apr 13 2012, 12:26 AM)
Read on JDW that Japan is looking into donating  ships to Phillipines , any1 any idea which?

Didn't happen and probably misreported by Phil press. The Japanese coast guard sent vessels to assist in Phil coast guard training under the coast watch initiative.

The South Koreans did donate the Pohang and the Filipinos did get the ex-Hamilton Cutter (Gregorio del Pilar) from the US under the EDA, both in the 2nd half of 2011.

This post has been edited by weasel1962 on Apr 13 2012, 09:14 AM
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warspite
Posted: Apr 13 2012, 10:33 AM


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Is the Pohang vessel transfer confirmed? Did not read any press release on this. Anyone can provide a link.
I believe that in the short term, a transfer of a couple of these corvettes, plus a couple more of ex-Hamiltons, would be a great boost for the PN...as long as their government is serious about upgrading their armed forces.
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weasel1962
Posted: Apr 13 2012, 10:47 AM


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Unconfirmed. The reports are that the PCC-758 will be transferred once its retired but its still in active ROKN service, last I read. PCC-757 was donated to Columbia. There were reports of proposed sale to another african country and that the PCC-758 could be donated to Columbia but the 758 transfer seems more credible.
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who
Posted: Apr 13 2012, 10:57 AM


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QUOTE (weasel1962 @ Apr 13 2012, 09:10 AM)
QUOTE (who @ Apr 13 2012, 12:26 AM)
Read on JDW that Japan is looking into donating  ships to Phillipines , any1 any idea which?

Didn't happen and probably misreported by Phil press. The Japanese coast guard sent vessels to assist in Phil coast guard training under the coast watch initiative.

The South Koreans did donate the Pohang and the Filipinos did get the ex-Hamilton Cutter (Gregorio del Pilar) from the US under the EDA, both in the 2nd half of 2011.

should not be as the quote came from the Japanese foreign ministry and not Phillipines

user posted image

This post has been edited by who on Apr 13 2012, 10:59 AM
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weasel1962
Posted: Apr 13 2012, 03:43 PM


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QUOTE (phichanad @ Apr 13 2012, 03:12 PM)
There was an offer for 2 large patrol vessels and 10 smaller patrol boats. Development Aid = Soft Loan. So it would be new ships for the Coast Guard (not the Navy). Could probably based on the same ships that the Japanese Coast Guard is using.

Yup but if you track ODA, there wasn't any thus far. The only grant in March was for infrastructure projects.

http://www.jica.go.jp/english/news/press/2011/120330_02.html

If you look at the summary of ODA projects for PH in the link below, the only one relating to the coast guard is the administration project which I think is part of the coast watch programme completed in Dec 2011. They sent ships but for training not transfer so I figure it probably got lost in translation when the Japanese offered Jap ships for training in PH rather than actually transferring them to the PH coast guard/navy.

http://www.jica.go.jp/philippine/english/index.html

As at today, no Japanese ship transfers to PH.
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xtemujin
  Posted: Apr 16 2012, 09:51 PM


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Noy: Philippines won't start war with China
The Philippine Star Updated April 16, 2012 01:21 PM

MANILA, Philippines — President Benigno Aquino III said on Monday that the Philippines will not start a war with China over a disputed shoal where their ships figured in a tense naval standoff for a week.

President Benigno Aquino III said the Philippines would assert its sovereignty over the Scarborough Shoal off the northwestern Philippines but has pulled out a warship and replaced it with a coast guard vessel to "de-escalate the situation."

Aquino said the Philippines will continue talks with China to resolve the impasse, which began last Tuesday when two Chinese ships prevented a Philippine warship from arresting several Chinese fishermen.

Aquino, quoting the late British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, said: "It's better to jaw, jaw, jaw than to war, war, war."

The president came out with the assurance as American and Philippine troops kicked off the annual "war games" Balikatan Exercises in Palawan province, near the disputed territory.

The war games near the disputed territory is being protested by China.

Two Philippine and American military officials assured that China is not being considered as an imaginary target in the war games, which involved at least 7,000 combined troops from both sides.

Philippine Army Maj. Emmanuel Garcia said that the annual drills will include combat maneuvers involving the mock retaking by US-backed Filipino troops of an oil rig supposedly seized by terrorists near the South China Sea.

US Marine Lt. Col. Curtis Hill said most of the other events will focus on humanitarian missions and disaster-response drills.

Last week, the Philippines and China eased the tension at the Scarborough Shoal, which involved the Philippine Navy's largest warship and two Chinese surveillance vessels.

The navy was later relieved by a ship of the Philippine Coast Guard (PCG), BRP Pampanga.

The standoff started after the Chinese vessels anchored between the Philippine Navy's BRP Gregorio del Pilar, and eight Chinese fishermen, who were supposed to be arrested for illegal fishing.

The tension eased after almost all of the Chinese vessels involved in the standoff left the shoal.

Meanwhile, Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert del Rosario reported over the weekend that China had boosted its presence in the Scarborough Shoal with its redeployment of a ship that had been thought to have already left the area.

An aircraft believed to be Chinese was also reported to have harassed the BRP Pampanga, which was relieved Monday by another PCG ship, BRP Edsa Dos.

Del Rosario said China’s show of might came despite its commitment to the Philippines that it would make “no surprises” while negotiations were underway. Associated Press



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Individual skill is another important factor, argues Professor Bernard Loo, a defence analyst at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies. “A half-past-six weapon in the hands of a skilled operator is better than a top-notch weapon in the hands of a half-trained monkey,” he says.
Top
xtemujin
  Posted: May 10 2012, 08:01 PM


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Enrile: $30M US aid for PHL defense an insult
May 6, 2012 4:49pm

The $30 million the United States has reportedly offered to boost the Philippines’ defense capabilities is so insufficient as to be insulting, Senate President Juan Ponce Enrile said Sunday.

Enrile said the amount was a pittance compared to the “benefits” the United States has been getting from the Philippines, adding he would reject it if he were President Benigno Aquino III.

“Kung $30 million lang, kung ako ang gobyerno ni Pangulong Aquino, sasabihin ko, ‘Thank you but I don’t need $30 million, we can provide that $30 million for ourselves," he said in an interview on dzBB radio.

He said the amount was an “insult,” as if the Philippines were begging for alms.

“Ano yan, parang nagpapalimos tayo. Ang laki ng pakinabang nila (What’s that? It’s as if we were begging for alms. The US benefited much from us),” he said.

Last Thursday, Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert del Rosario disclosed the US has committed to double the initial $15 million in Foreign Military Financing (FMF) allocation for the Philippines to $30 million for the fiscal year 2012.

Del Rosario also said the Philippines has asked the US to supply the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) with patrol boats and aircraft as well as radar systems amid a month-old territorial dispute with China at the Panatag (Scarborough) Shoal.

When asked if the Philippines deserved more in terms of aid, Enrile said, “I consider my country something worth fighting for, and America must honor her commitment to us.”

“If indeed and I think America is an honorable country, they must honor their military commitment to us under our treaty arrangement. If they don’t, what is the use of having them as an ally?” he added.

Enrile said what is left now for Filipinos is to develop their own defense capability.

“Wala tayong ibang maasahan para magkaroon ng seguridad bilang isang bansa kagaya natin. Tayong mga Pilipino, dapat isipin natin walang ibang tutulong sa atin kundi sarili natin. Paggastusan natin ang seguridad ng bansa natin at pangalagaan ang resources ng bansa natin," he said.

(We cannot rely on anyone but ourselves in ensuring our national security. No one else can help Filipinos but Filipinos themselves. We must spend for our own security and for taking care of our own resources).

He said the country cannot even rely on its colleagues in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations for security, as far as its territorial row with China is concerned.

Enrile said ASEAN members have trade relations with China and will likely act according to their own interests.

“Ang mga yan may kanya-kanyang interest yan... meron silang trade relations sa China, marami ring negosyo ang China sa kanila, sila maraming negosyo sa China," he said. — LBG/HS, GMA News

http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/25731...fense-an-insult


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Individual skill is another important factor, argues Professor Bernard Loo, a defence analyst at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies. “A half-past-six weapon in the hands of a skilled operator is better than a top-notch weapon in the hands of a half-trained monkey,” he says.
Top
xtemujin
  Posted: May 10 2012, 08:06 PM


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Warships steam to stormy seas
Agencies and Phila Siu
Thursday, May 10, 2012

China has sent five warships to the disputed Scarborough Shoal off the west coast of the Philippines with the warning that Beijing is ready for "any escalation" of the conflict.
That comes as the outgunned Philippines looks to the United States for naval support in South China Sea territory that may be rich in energy sources.

The five warships are said to be among the most advanced vessels in the Chinese fleet.

They include ships with state-of-the- art systems against attack from the sky, while one is an assault ship that carries 20 amphibious tanks and specialized fighting teams among 800 personnel.

Japanese surveillance aircraft saw the flotilla west of Okinawa and sailing south on Sunday.

Experts said they appeared to be rehearsing emergency drills while sailing full speed ahead.

Reports from the Philippines, meanwhile, are that an increasing number of Chinese boats - mostly fishing vessels - are around the Scarborough Shoal. About 33 were reported there a day ago after 14 were counted last week. There are also what are said to be fisheries research and patrol vessels.

The Philippines has just two naval craft near the shoal, which covers about 150 square kilometers of sea west of Luzon.

The main island on the shoal is called Huangyan by China.

The month-long flare-up is one of the most high-profile incidents for years between the two countries over claims in the South China Sea.

The shoal is about 230km from the Philippines and 1,200km from China, with Manila saying it is definitely its territory under the Law of the Sea.

But Vice Foreign Minister Fu Ying said on Monday that Beijing was ready for "any escalation" of the standoff when he met a Philippine diplomat.

In response to China's stance, the word from Manila is that the United States has pledged to help protect the country from attacks in the South China Sea.

Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin said he had received the assurances during talks in Washington.

Gazmin said he also interpreted remarks by US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to mean Washington is ready to help Manila.

Trouble is also building on land, with warnings from Beijing yesterday to Chinese citizens in Manila. They were told to stay off the streets and take precautions during planned anti- Chinese protests tomorrow.

A Foreign Ministry official in Beijing accused Manila of overheating the situation and said damage is being done to Sino-Philippine relations with events such as the protest rally.

Back at sea, there was another struggle shaping up as competing Chinese media sought to be seen at the heart of a situation that is generating much nationalistic heat.

Uploaded to the internet was a picture of a man claimed to be a staffer with Shanghai Media Group's Shanghai Dragon Television striking as pose with a Chinese flag on what was said to be Scarborough Shoal.

http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_detail....4113&con_type=3


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Individual skill is another important factor, argues Professor Bernard Loo, a defence analyst at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies. “A half-past-six weapon in the hands of a skilled operator is better than a top-notch weapon in the hands of a half-trained monkey,” he says.
Top
YourFather
Posted: May 10 2012, 09:22 PM


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QUOTE (xtemujin @ May 10 2012, 08:01 PM)
Enrile: $30M US aid for PHL defense an insult
May 6, 2012 4:49pm

The $30 million the United States has reportedly offered to boost the Philippines’ defense capabilities is so insufficient as to be insulting, Senate President Juan Ponce Enrile said Sunday.

Enrile said the amount was a pittance compared to the “benefits” the United States has been getting from the Philippines, adding he would reject it if he were President Benigno Aquino III.

“Kung $30 million lang, kung ako ang gobyerno ni Pangulong Aquino, sasabihin ko, ‘Thank you but I don’t need $30 million, we can provide that $30 million for ourselves," he said in an interview on dzBB radio.

He said the amount was an “insult,” as if the Philippines were begging for alms.

“Ano yan, parang nagpapalimos tayo. Ang laki ng pakinabang nila (What’s that? It’s as if we were begging for alms. The US benefited much from us),” he said.

Last Thursday, Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert del Rosario disclosed the US has committed to double the initial $15 million in Foreign Military Financing (FMF) allocation for the Philippines to $30 million for the fiscal year 2012.

Del Rosario also said the Philippines has asked the US to supply the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) with patrol boats and aircraft as well as radar systems amid a month-old territorial dispute with China at the Panatag (Scarborough) Shoal.

When asked if the Philippines deserved more in terms of aid, Enrile said, “I consider my country something worth fighting for, and America must honor her commitment to us.”

“If indeed and I think America is an honorable country, they must honor their military commitment to us under our treaty arrangement. If they don’t, what is the use of having them as an ally?” he added.

Enrile said what is left now for Filipinos is to develop their own defense capability.

“Wala tayong ibang maasahan para magkaroon ng seguridad bilang isang bansa kagaya natin. Tayong mga Pilipino, dapat isipin natin walang ibang tutulong sa atin kundi sarili natin. Paggastusan natin ang seguridad ng bansa natin at pangalagaan ang resources ng bansa natin," he said.

(We cannot rely on anyone but ourselves in ensuring our national security. No one else can help Filipinos but Filipinos themselves. We must spend for our own security and for taking care of our own resources).

He said the country cannot even rely on its colleagues in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations for security, as far as its territorial row with China is concerned.

Enrile said ASEAN members have trade relations with China and will likely act according to their own interests.

“Ang mga yan may kanya-kanyang interest yan... meron silang trade relations sa China, marami ring negosyo ang China sa kanila, sila maraming negosyo sa China," he said. — LBG/HS, GMA News

http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/25731...fense-an-insult

Utterly amazing. You could fire a 120mm DU APFSDS at his face and it won't penetrate. laugh.gif


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I don't quarrel with baboons.
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spiderweb6969
Posted: May 10 2012, 09:25 PM


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PH junks plan to buy 'ageing' F16s
09-May-12, 2:39 PM | Abigail Kwok, Interaksyon.com

MANILA, Philippines -- The Philippines has abandoned plans to purchase “ageing” F16 fighter jets from the United States after deciding repairing and refurbishing the aircraft would cost too much.


“F16 is an ageing air asset that will be given to us. It’s mothballed and if you’re going to refurbish it, we have to evaluate because it will cost too much,” Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin told a news briefing.


Even after refurbishing, he added, the jets would only have three to four years of flying time left.


“Lugi ka (You lose),” Gazmin said.


The defense chief said the fighter jets were not brought up during the 2+2 meeting with US officials in Washington.


However, the Philippine government has lined up the purchase of several air assets, including 21 Vietnam War-vintage UH1H helicopters, 10 attack helicopters and two C130 cargo planes.
The Philippines is also expecting four additional SoKol choppers within the year.



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spiderweb6969
Posted: May 10 2012, 09:26 PM


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QUOTE (YourFather @ May 10 2012, 09:22 PM)
QUOTE (xtemujin @ May 10 2012, 08:01 PM)
Enrile: $30M US aid for PHL defense an insult
May 6, 2012 4:49pm

The $30 million the United States has reportedly offered to boost the Philippines’ defense capabilities is so insufficient as to be insulting, Senate President Juan Ponce Enrile said Sunday.

Enrile said the amount was a pittance compared to the “benefits” the United States has been getting from the Philippines, adding he would reject it if he were President Benigno Aquino III.

“Kung $30 million lang, kung ako ang gobyerno ni Pangulong Aquino, sasabihin ko, ‘Thank you but I don’t need $30 million, we can provide that $30 million for ourselves," he said in an interview on dzBB radio.

He said the amount was an “insult,” as if the Philippines were begging for alms.

“Ano yan, parang nagpapalimos tayo. Ang laki ng pakinabang nila (What’s that? It’s as if we were begging for alms. The US benefited much from us),” he said.

Last Thursday, Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert del Rosario disclosed the US has committed to double the initial $15 million in Foreign Military Financing (FMF) allocation for the Philippines to $30 million for the fiscal year 2012.

Del Rosario also said the Philippines has asked the US to supply the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) with patrol boats and aircraft as well as radar systems amid a month-old territorial dispute with China at the Panatag (Scarborough) Shoal.

When asked if the Philippines deserved more in terms of aid, Enrile said, “I consider my country something worth fighting for, and America must honor her commitment to us.”

“If indeed and I think America is an honorable country, they must honor their military commitment to us under our treaty arrangement. If they don’t, what is the use of having them as an ally?” he added.

Enrile said what is left now for Filipinos is to develop their own defense capability.

“Wala tayong ibang maasahan para magkaroon ng seguridad bilang isang bansa kagaya natin. Tayong mga Pilipino, dapat isipin natin walang ibang tutulong sa atin kundi sarili natin. Paggastusan natin ang seguridad ng bansa natin at pangalagaan ang resources ng bansa natin," he said.

(We cannot rely on anyone but ourselves in ensuring our national security. No one else can help Filipinos but Filipinos themselves. We must spend for our own security and for taking care of our own resources).

He said the country cannot even rely on its colleagues in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations for security, as far as its territorial row with China is concerned.

Enrile said ASEAN members have trade relations with China and will likely act according to their own interests.

“Ang mga yan may kanya-kanyang interest yan... meron silang trade relations sa China, marami ring negosyo ang China sa kanila, sila maraming negosyo sa China," he said. — LBG/HS, GMA News

http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/25731...fense-an-insult

Utterly amazing. You could fire a 120mm DU APFSDS at his face and it won't penetrate. laugh.gif

The skin is really that thick


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Typhoon
Posted: May 10 2012, 10:07 PM


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fuck it let the PRC have them
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